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Awe and understanding: 3 gift ideas for garden inspiration

by Timber Press on December 11, 2012

in Design

Nature can be both a source of awe and understanding. Photo by Robert Llewellyn.

Inspiration can move us to new heights. Or just plain move us. It can get us out of bed in the morning and fuel our dreams at night. Inspiration is often the reason for writing a book, or in our case, for publishing one. To be useful, inspiration must be shared, and whether the result is awe or understanding, we hope our books move you to new heights. Or just plain move you.

The Layered Garden
David Culp
In The Layered Garden, David Culp takes readers on a tour of his celebrated gardens at Brandywine Cottage, providing valuable insight into the design technique of layering. This is not a matter of bragging rights, however, his results are as attainable as they are admirable. Design lessons for year-round beauty says the subtitle, and with good reason. David puts it this way: “Just as we can learn much by the peering into individual flowers, the close examination of any good garden, along with insights into the minds and the methods of its gardeners, can teach many lessons.”

Buy this book: Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Indiebound | Timber Press

 

Seeing Trees
Nancy Ross Hugo
“The rewards of observing intimate tree details such as maturing acorns, unfurling beech leaves, and emerging walnut flowers,” explains Nancy Ross Hugo, is what inspired her to write Seeing Trees. She wants us to see trees as she does: not as “symbols of fortitude and patience” but as survivors and early adapters. After all, trees have been evolving almost 400 million years longer than humans. And, as she puts it, “there is no small wisdom in the adaptation they have made to survive in a changing environment.”

Buy this book: Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Indiebound | Timber Press

 

The Wild Garden
William Robinson
Who knows how many gardeners William Robinson has inspired? In The Wild Garden, he challenged the practice of tender plants arranged in geometric designs, instead advocating for locally adapted plants arranged according to local growing conditions. While this sentiment may sound familiar to us today, The Wild Garden was first published in 1870! Perhaps Robinson was ahead of his time, or maybe we’ve just come full circle. One thing is certain, only a profound truth could resonate for that long.

Buy this book: Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Indiebound | Timber Press

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Bernadette Fox December 12, 2012 at 5:05 pm

I have lots of Timber Press books and I am always impressed with the quality. I came across your blog just today and thought to write a quick comment expressing how much I love what you guys do! “To be useful, inspiration must be shared, and whether the result is awe or understanding, we hope our books move you to new heights. Or just plain move you.” I am always looking for inspiration and your post was right on. Being a freelance writer I have been enjoying blogging myself. I have been blogging for awhile through my art blog as well as a regular contributor to Greenhouse Megastore’s garden blog. I am what I like to call a budding horticulturalist and a seasoned crafter and I put those two together in my new gardening and crafting blog and YouTube channel. So, It was refreshing to find your blog and visit your YouTube channel today and be inspired and motivated. Best wishes for a blessed Christmas and a fruitful New Year!

2 Brian Ridder December 13, 2012 at 12:06 pm

Hi Bernadette! Thanks so much for the kind words. We’ll keep an eye on your blog, too!

3 Philip @ Acobs Global October 13, 2017 at 1:32 am

I’m new to gardening but my parents are loving it. Thanks for the great ideas.

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