Our mission is to share the wonders of the natural world by publishing books from experts in the fields of gardening, horticulture, and natural history. Grow with us.

A stand of red alder grows along Panther Creek in Washington’s Gifford Pinchot Wilderness. Included photos by the author unless otherwise noted.

To determine whether harvesting is appropriate and to ensure that the places where we harvest medicinal plants remain healthy and viable for many generations to come, I encourage you to gain as much understanding as possible of the intricate web of interrelations that keep ecosystems functioning in a healthy way.

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The edge of this garden shows the layers that are characteristic of the woodland garden style. All included photos by the author.

When designing your shade garden, it is helpful to study existing gardens to get ideas and inspiration.

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Wild blue phlox, tiarella, and yellow corydalis usher the visitor to a shaded sitting spot. Photo by C. Colston Burrell.

These gardens exemplify the many ways that design can transform a garden from something merely pleasant into an extraordinary blend of plants, hardscape, and that elusive quality, “sense of place.”

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To determine the best placement for plantings and structures, permaculture offers you a way to look at the garden in terms of zones, and there are sustainable options for gardens of every size.

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Are you wasting energy?

by Timber Press on March 31, 2017

in Design

This old-style windmill sits on the island of Shodoshima in Japan.

For existing buildings, an energy audit is a great place to start. You can do your own simple energy audit or have a professional consultant do a more thorough, technical job. Some cities, states, and utilities offer incentives for doing an energy audit on your home. Ultimately, an energy audit will tell you where inefficiencies show up and suggest ways to fix them.

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Mountain chickadee. Dense shelter trees, such as pines, are critical for the survival of resident birds.

By observing the surrounding countryside in your region, birds present in remnant habitats, parks, and gardens, and researching the species that once lived in your area or passed through during migration, you can discover what species of birds are likely to be attracted to your garden. Then you can plan your garden to cater to their specific feeding, shelter, and nesting requirements.

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Richard Hager gardens so much and is so involved in the plant world that for years, I thought he was a professional gardener. Together, he and I, along with his lifelong and equally inquisitive gardening friend, Alfred Burnside (left), embarked on a restoration of a 1930s camellia garden. right The objects of daily life provide the structure of Richard’s garden.

Photograph by Augustus Jenkins Farmer for Deep-Rooted Wisdom.

Many of the best books on the shelves are inspired by nature, and many more are inspired by other nature writing. At Timber Press, a reverence for nature and a passion for gardening are never in short supply. After you come inside to wash the dirt off your hands, enjoy these brief excerpts from some of the best garden writing around.

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Make the thoughtful gift of Mother’s Day flowers last the rest of the year with inspiration from Caitlin Atkinson’s Plant Craft. After enjoying your bouquet in a vase for a few days, clip off your favorite blooms and follow these instructions for an easy, DIY decor makeover.

Click on image to enlarge, right-click to download and print.

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Click on image to enlarge, right-click to download and print.

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Click on image to enlarge, right-click to download and print.

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