Our mission is to share the wonders of the natural world by publishing books from experts in the fields of gardening, horticulture, and natural history. Grow with us.

A currant bush studded with ripe berries is a striking sight in a garden. Most ornamental gardeners focus on what fl owers can bring to a scene, forgetting too often that berries also contribute color and beauty. Image: Flickr/S. Biofile

A currant bush studded with ripe berries is a striking sight in a garden. Most ornamental gardeners focus on what flowers can bring to a scene, forgetting too often that berries also contribute color and beauty. Image: Flickr/S. Biofile

Why aren’t berry plants used more frequently in the landscape?

It is hard to imagine an entity with more aesthetic appeal than a berry, each with its own vibrant color, sensual shape, often inviting smoothness, and fruity fragrance. The fact that this perfect package of utility and form is borne on plants which themselves offer such variety of shape, form, and color only adds to its allure.

Why, then, aren’t berry plants used more frequently in the landscape? There are two answers to the question. One is that many gardeners are simply not familiar with berry-producing plants. The second is that, in addition to their fabulous possibilities, certain berry plants have signature pitfalls. Rather than seeing these as immutable shortcomings, though, we can develop more realistic expectations about how the plants will perform by better understanding their limitations.

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Note: Guides to the Midwest & Southern California coming December 2015!

The authors of our regional Vegetable Gardening Guides share their favorite vegetables as well as what makes their region so special.

Gardeners are not all the same. But gardening advice often is. What works for one gardener may not work for another, especially if they live in different parts of the country. The Timber Press Guides to Vegetable Gardening solve that with advice from regional experts. These gardeners know what works, where. And they want to save you from frustration.

Read on to find which one is right for you.

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Our authors share the love at the Northwest’s largest garden trade show.

18 Timber Press authors are presenting at this year’s Northwest Flower & Garden Show! The seminar schedule is packed with them and each will sign books after their presentation. Check out all of the amazing speakers and buy your tickets now.

Keep reading for a full list of Timber Press author presentations.

See you at the show!

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A little imagination can bring an edible garden to even the most unlikely nooks and spaces. Image: Derek St. Romaine

A little imagination can bring an edible garden to even the most unlikely nooks and spaces. Image: Derek St. Romaine

Andrea Bellamy outlines the basics of creating abundant and attractive Small-Space Vegetable Gardens.

When you want to grow food in a small space, every square inch of soil has to work extra hard. Experienced small-space gardeners use a number of techniques to get the most from their gardens. Practicing succession planting, vertical growing, and winter gardening, for example, allow you to harvest more food over a longer season. Learn the basics, then put them into practice in your garden.

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Start a Community Food Garden author LaManda Joy’s tips on how to keep community gardeners engaged and entertained.

Each season brings its challenges and opportunities. The needs of the growing season naturally dictate potential activities or programs, and during your busy building and planting season, there are lots of reasons for people to be together in the garden. But as the garden slows down, the opportunities for people to congregate and build community become less obvious, so you will want to be creative about providing rationale and opportunities to get together. Local or national holidays can provide a backbone for events or celebrations. And the needs of the garden organization itself might provide fodder for meetings or other gatherings.

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Thank you!

by Timber Press on December 24, 2014

in News

A very special thanks to you all. We are honored and humbled by your support.

2014 Happy Holidays MASTER

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9781604694635fHave a look inside the book Dominique Browning of The New York Times says, “should be on every serious gardener’s shelf.”

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The new woodland garden

by Timber Press on December 18, 2014

in Design

Candelabra primulas, rodgersias and other moisture-loving perennials crowd the lower, damper sections of a glade at Wildside.

Candelabra primulas, rodgersias and other moisture-loving perennials crowd the lower, damper sections of a glade at Wildside.

Author Keith Wiley shares his approach to Designing and Planting a Woodland Garden.

As so often in my gardening life it was by observing plants in the wild, particularly the seemingly effortless way they combine, that sparked my desire to experiment with a wider range of woodland plants. My general approach to gardening tends to be holistic, which means that I see the whole woodland garden environment as a single unit which is in balance from the tallest tree down to the smallest bulb. Gardens like this do not rely solely on a blaze of spring glory but instead have a natural look that is always changing. This differs structurally from the stereotypical woodland garden by having fewer and less densely planted shrubs in the understorey layer, which in turn lets more light reach the woodland floor and allows a wider range of plants to grow there.

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Give the gift of gardening!

Help the garden designer in your life build their library with books hand-picked by Timber Press staff. If you don’t find the right one in this post, try searching our catalog for more great garden design books.

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Books for both garden and outdoor enthusiasts.

When asked to choose one book to recommend, a number of staff members picked a title specific to our region. Since our main office is located in Portland, Oregon, we may be a little partial to the area. Through our books, however, we most definitely work to celebrate and share the mighty Pacific Northwest!

Click here for a complete list of our Pacific Northwest books.

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