Our mission is to share the wonders of the natural world by publishing books from experts in the fields of gardening, horticulture, and natural history. Grow with us.

Altitude has a major impact on the nature of plant communities and the climatic tolerances of the component species. This alpine vegetation of Sichuan grows at 4000 m. Photos by the author.

“I think almost all planting is in some way a combination of the artistic and the scientific, and my work is no different.” —James Hitchmough

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The peaty soil at Inverewe provides perfect conditions for choice, acid-loving plants like primulas, rhododendrons, and Himalayan blue poppies. Photos by the author.

With this excerpt from Joseph Tychonievich’s Rock Gardening, you can decode the acidity of your soil to pick the best plants for your plot.

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“No one should to be a slave to their garden. A garden should be enjoyed and give peace.” —Tracy DiSabato-Aust

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Photo by Maya Blum.

“Even more than success, mistakes are the key to learning and personal growth, and the lessons often stick.” —Leslie Buck

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Beautiful fall color makes Acer saccharum (sugar maple) one of the most beloved midwestern native trees. Loose Park, Kansas City, Missouri. All included photos by the author.

How do you define the spirit of the Midwest? In this excerpt from Native Plants of the Midwest, Alan Branhagen captures the spirit of this unique region in rich prose that is equally informative and beautiful:

“It’s the blend between the verdant lush forests of the Appalachians on the east and the dry, short grasses of the Great Plains on the west. It lies below the cold boreal evergreen northern woods and above the great steamy southern swamps and pinelands. It is a land defined by a prevalence of open woods and savannas and tallgrass prairie.”

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The bright pink fall bloom of commanding Ceiba speciosa. Photos by Marion Brenner.

In this excerpt from her book, The Bold Dry Garden, Johanna Silver honors the legacy of Ruth Bancroft and the pioneering landscaping of the Ruth Bancroft Garden. With diverging public attitudes toward the current climate crisis, garden preservation, waterwise planting, and conservation activism have never been more important—let Ruth Bancroft’s fearless gardening be your guide.

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Photos by Karen Randall unless otherwise stated.

It’s so easy to fall under the spell of a skillfully planted aquarium: it’s like peeking into a tropical forest, an enchanted meadow, or a miniature mountain range. In Sunken Gardens, Karen Randall explains how to plan, design, plant, and maintain a beautiful, thriving aquascape. Here are some of our favorite images of these strange and beautiful underwater worlds.

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Natural blackberry beads

by Timber Press on February 1, 2017

in Craft, Design

Wool fleece soaks in a cold deep purple blackberry dye bath. All images by Tristan Davison.

Knowing your neighborhood can lead to beautiful dye colors! Blackberries can be foraged in both wild and urban areas. Blackberry leaves and stems produce shades of yellow to gray-greens to dark teal-gray, while the berries offer deep purples and pinks. Transform your textiles into treasures—wood beads, wool yarn, a silk dress, or preowned sweaters—starting with this simple DIY project.

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Photos by the authors.

Drying is the oldest and geographically universal way to preserve pepper pods, and it works well for most peppers—except for the very meaty ones such as jalapeños, which are smoke-dried and called chipotles. Using dried peppers, store-bought or grown and preserved from scratch, you can add delicious heat to any dish.

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DIY hosta leaf mosaic

by Timber Press on February 1, 2017

in Craft

All images by Justin Myers.

Though this leaf design is a simple-moderate mosaic project, it gives you the opportunity to play with grout lines and color values and more deeply explore the beautiful range of hues found in hosta plants.

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