Our mission is to share the wonders of the natural world by publishing books from experts in the fields of gardening, horticulture, and natural history. Grow with us.

Rudbeckia seeded into the homeowner’s entry garden from the surrounding planted meadows. Image: Rob Cardillo

Rudbeckia seeded into the homeowner’s entry garden from the surrounding planted meadows. Image: Rob Cardillo

Garden Revolution co-author Larry Weaner on how weeding can be a help and a hindrance in the garden.

Old habits are hard to break. While I enjoy working with clients who are horticulturally knowledgeable, at times they are hesitant to carry out the horticulturally “wrong” techniques that I recommend, even when they require less work. I can recall one client in particular with whom this was the case.

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International Orange Chair. Images: Katie Jackson and Ellen Blackmar

With Hand-Built Outdoor Furniture, author Katie Jackson wants to help you create the perfect outdoor space with furnishings you build yourself. In this post, she offers advice on how to get started.

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From the moment a spade broke ground for the new presidential mansion, the eighteen acres that surround the White House have been a backdrop to history. Here’s a sample of that history, collected from All the Presidents’ Gardens by Marta McDowell.

All the Presidents' Gardens Timeline Graphic 140Click on image to enlarge, right-click to download and print.

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Beautiful, large ficus trees make this modern lobby more warm and inviting. Image: Beth Harding

Beautiful, large ficus trees make this modern lobby more warm and inviting. Image: Harding Botanicals

Plants provide more than a decorative touch to the indoor environment. The Manual of Interior Plantscaping author Kathy Fediw explains how they bring people together, help them relax, and create an environment for cooperation and collaboration.

Indoor plants play an important role in interior design. They bring in a living element that is portable, growing, and ever-changing, for a fraction of the cost of a new wall or architectural element. They provide function and form while looking beautiful. They can change the ambiance and feel of a space. They add color to complement any décor. They enhance the design without interfering with other important design elements.

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Pansy orchid (aka milmiltoniopsis)

Pansy orchid (aka milmiltoniopsis)

What’s Wrong With My Houseplant? authors David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth explain what’s found in common potting media and offer several ways to create your own organic alternative.

When you purchase a bag of “potting soil” from your local garden center what you’re actually getting is not soil. It’s an artificial mixture of ingredients specifically designed to meet the needs of plants in containers and usually contains no actual soil at all. Garden soil, plain old dirt to some, does not promote good growth of container plants because it becomes more and more dense and airless over time. Garden soil is perfectly adequate—in the garden—where it benefits from the activities of worms, insects, fungi, and bacteria. But a pot is a special environment, not a garden, and any plant in a pot has special needs that cannot be met by ordinary garden soil alone.

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The nose knows!

by Timber Press on April 20, 2016

in Gardening

Fragrant plants can be as therapeutic as they are intoxicating. In The Aromatherapy Garden, author Kathi Keville shows us how easy it is to add this captivating element to gardens large and small.

Aromatherapy GraphicClick on image to enlarge, right-click to download and print.

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The East Garden, designed during the Wilson administration by Beatrix Farrand, in a 1921 photograph by Frances Benjamin Johnston. Image: Smithsonian Institution Libraries

The East Garden, designed during the Wilson administration by Beatrix Farrand, in a 1921 photograph by Frances Benjamin Johnston. Image: Smithsonian Institution Libraries

In All the Presidents’ Gardens, Marta McDowell details how the White House grounds have grown with America. Here, she looks at the gardeners who over the years have been responsible for the eighteen acres at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

These horticulturists were not name-droppers. Unlike many ushers, maids, and dressmakers through the decades, they did not publish memoirs, so in many cases the biographical record is sketchy. Perhaps this league of extraordinary gardeners simply preferred the trowel to the pen.

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Our best response to the erratic nature of desert rain is to capture  rainwater from rooftops to create blooming oases. Image: Judith Phillips

Our best response to the erratic nature of desert rain is to capture rainwater from rooftops to create blooming oases. Image: Judith Phillips

Growing the Southwest Garden author Judith Phillips on the importance and practicality of harvesting rainwater in dry climates.

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The authors of our regional Vegetable Gardening Guides share their favorite vegetables as well as what makes their region so special.

Gardeners are not all the same. But gardening advice often is. What works for one gardener may not work for another, especially if they live in different parts of the country. The Timber Press Guides to Vegetable Gardening solve that with advice from regional experts. These gardeners know what works, where. And they want to save you from frustration. Read on to find which one is right for you.

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