Our mission is to share the wonders of the natural world by publishing books from experts in the fields of gardening, horticulture, and natural history. Grow with us.

Just as permaculture is inspired by natural systems, co-authors Jessi Bloom and Dave Boehnlein hope to inspire you to more sustainable gardening with their book Practical Permaculture. The following quotes are some of the words that inspired them to such practices and to write about it.

Permaculture Quotes 5 550 [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

046_0040_02_JB-WEB

One of the outdoor feel-good spaces where Jessi can spend time with family and friends.

An inside look at how (and why) Practical Permaculture co-author Jessi Bloom turned her property into a permaculture homestead.

[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Drought-Loving Plants MEDIUM

[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Epimedium ‘Kaguyahime’. Image: Mark Bolton

Epimedium ‘Kaguyahime’. Image: Mark Bolton

Tips for growing this popular plant in smaller spaces from the author of The Plant Lover’s Guide to Epimediums.

Gardens are getting increasingly smaller in this modern world. At one time, every house would have been built with a garden for children to play on the grass, for growing vegetables, and for relaxing with friends. Now there are constraints of smaller areas for building and additional profit for builders, and garden space is usually the first casualty. In many countries throughout the world, more people are living in cities where the only outdoor space is a balcony or even a window box, so pots and containers fulfill an important function. Whereas the more vigorous spreading forms of Epimedium are not entirely suitable for containers, the smaller Japanese plants and the new Chinese species and their hybrids are ideal.

[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Tulips and hyacinths bloom in Central Park, New York. All images: Kerry Michaels

Tulips and hyacinths bloom in Central Park, New York. All images: Kerry Michaels

The author of Growing the Northeast Garden reflects on a region well-known for its seasons and takes us through one of its many beautiful gardens.

You’ll often hear that the Northeast “has” seasons. Most every place does, but given our place on the map, this speaks to how the differences between ours are more pronounced. Each season promises joys and headaches of its very own, but one thing’s for sure: there’s never a dull moment. Let’s consider the Northeast’s seasons in the garden.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The remarkable red foliage of Dryopteris erythrosora (autumn fern) in spring. Once established in the garden, this species is drought tolerant.

The remarkable red foliage of Dryopteris erythrosora (autumn fern) in spring. Once established in the garden, this species is drought tolerant.

Add a calming lushness to garden or woodland with these picks from the authors of The Plant Lover’s Guide to Ferns.

Massed and groundcover ferns are great for creating repetition of texture, pattern, and form. Groundcover ferns are especially useful in the woodland. Their rambling nature allows them to find the most suitable location in which to thrive. Ferns for this purpose tend to have either a clumping to slow-spreading habit or a running habit characterized by vigorous underground rhizomes. The first decision for the gardener is to decide which of these two types would be best for a particular situation.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The author of Small-Space Vegetable Gardens on the advantages of smaller gardens and the best edible plants for them.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

The rose garden at Ragley Hall, Warwickshire, where the roses are planted alongside asters and other herbaceous plants, trees, shrubs, and bulbs.

The rose garden at Ragley Hall, Warwickshire, where the roses are planted alongside asters and other herbaceous plants, trees, shrubs, and bulbs. All images by Paul Picton.

Reduce the need for chemicals while increasing wildlife diversity with these companion planting suggestions from The Plant Lover’s Guide to Asters.

Away from the traditional positions such as herbaceous borders, asters can find homes in places that may seem surprising to the uninitiated. An increasingly common idea is that to reduce the need for chemicals in the garden, and to keep roses healthy and happy, they need to be planted with other plants. The increased diversity encourages more wildlife to the garden including the natural predators of pesky visitors, namely, aphids.

A more truthful sentiment than “roses need friends” has rarely been uttered, but how does this relate directly to asters? The answer is twofold. Firstly, many roses will have a second flush of flowers, and some are even naturally late, which means that either way their flowering coincides with the earliest of the autumn asters. For example, a stunning display can be achieved using the lavender-blue mounds of Aster ×frikartii ‘Wunder von Stäfa’ to complement the deep pink Rosa ‘Braveheart’. Secondly, if the roses do not have a second flush, a rose garden can be empty of color and interest for a remarkably long time. This can be solved by using asters to bring the garden back to life for the autumn without detracting from the earlier beauty of the roses.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

LaManda Joy, founder of the Peterson Garden Project in Chicago

LaManda Joy, founder of the Peterson Garden Project in Chicago

The Start a Community Food Garden author on getting involved in gardening and in your community.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

What do roses need?

by Timber Press on March 19, 2015

in Gardening

A large-flowered climber, 'Rosanna' is a very strong grower, sending up large and sturdy canes that are covered in deep green, glossy foliage. Image: Peter Kukielski

A large-flowered climber, ‘Rosanna’ is a very strong grower, sending up large and sturdy canes that are covered in deep green, glossy foliage. Image: Peter Kukielski

The key to healthy, prosperous roses is knowing what they need. In this post, Roses Without Chemicals author Peter Kuklieski explains the basics.

Over the years I have been asked time and again, “What do I do with my rose when I take it home? How do I plant it and care for it?” My answer has evolved over the years, and nowadays I like to stress that the main thing is to understand what roses need in order to thrive.

[click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }